TEX WILLER

Monthly, B/W, 16x21 cm, 112 pages. Also available in specials, annuals and super-special giant size volumes

Year of birth: 1948. So the most popular hero of Italian comics is now over fifty years old. And he certainly doesn't show his age! Created by Gianluigi Bonelli (scripts) and Aurelio Galleppini (artwork), Tex Willer, the most dearly-loved Ranger of Italy, still occupies an extremely prominent position on the Italian market, even after more than half a century of published life. The first among the Italian western heroes to incorporate the point of view of Native Americans into the stories (and this long before the advent, in cinema, in the early seventies, of the "crepuscular" western), Tex experiences all his adventures in the company of his three faithful pards: his son, the young half-breed Kit Willer (born from Tex's marriage to the Navajo girl Lilyth, who dies in tragic circumstances), the crafty old Kit Carson and the Navajo warrior Tiger Jack. Tex's philosophy is very simple: to fight against all kinds of injustice, defend the rights of the Navajos (in the guise of Aquila della Notte, supreme chief of the tribe) and of all oppressed individuals (as an official member of the Corps of Rangers). Often set in exotic scenarios, the Tex stories cleverly blend classical Western themes with atmospheres verging on horror and the fantastic (alien space ships that land in Arizona, voodoo sects, mad scientists…), above all in the adventures where he is up against his enemy "Number One", the diabolical Mefisto. There are countless reasons for the success and popularity of Tex, including the vitality, variety and wealth of features that have been one of the distinctive characteristics of the series ever since its first appearance on news-stands. In those years, in Italy, the mythology of the West, built up above all through its depiction in movies, was still unsophisticated and stereotyped. Tex burst onto the scene like the crack of a whip, a vigorously innovative proposal that broke away from long-established conventions (not merely of the world of comics): his boundless verve, his, in some sense, non-mainstream and "maverick" attitudes opened up a new and broader horizon for the post-war reader's imagination. Today 'Tex' is not only one of the most popular Italian comics, a veritable epos in the classical sense, a sort of self-sufficient universe, but it has also become a significant element of Italian culture and a rare example, especially for a serial, of the production of flights of fancy that have maintained all their freshness and liveliness despite their amazingly long existence (more than 600 issues so far).

 

The answers are taken from an interview conducted by Decio Canzio and published in the book "Il mio nome e' Tex".
Gian Luigi Bonelli
replies to your questions:

TEX HAS BEEN AN ENORMOUS POPULAR SUCCESS FOR OVER THIRTY YEARS: THIS CHARACTER, HIS TYPICAL PHRASES, HIS WORLD HAVE ALMOST BECOME PART OF THE ITALIAN WAY OF LIFE. NEVERTHELESS, IT'S ONLY IN THE LAST FEW YEARS THAT THIS POPULAR TRIUMPH HAS BEEN MATCHED BY APPRAISAL IN THE MEDIA, WHICH PREVIOUSLY SEEMED TO LOOK RATHER SCORNFULLY DOWN THEIR NOSES AT TEX (AND AT COMIC STRIPS IN GENERAL). COULD YOU COMMENT ON THIS?
I must admit that I was - and still am - completely indifferent to these attitudes. When I was writing Tex, I used to think of my readers, common people, friends I met in the streets. They're the same people who go to the newsstand to buy the comics issues. Are there so many people who still read Tex today? Well, that means my work's served some useful purpose. Anyway, let me say I'm proud that Tex has helped to change the negative attitude towards comic strips, an attitude that was heavily penalizing until not so long ago.
TEX'S ENORMOUS SUCCESS AS A PUBLISHING PRODUCT HAS RESULTED IN A PROLIFERATION OF SHOW-CASE REVIEWS, ROUND TABLES, DEBATES, ALL DEVOTED TO THIS CHARACTER. ONE NEED ONLY MENTION "LA BALLATA DI TEX", THE VERY FINE TRAVELING EXHIBITION CREATED BY BERTIERI AND POLIDORI. HOWEVER, YOU HAVE HARDLY EVER - IF AT ALL - BEEN PRESENT AT ANY OF THESE EVENTS. WHY?
I am not one to appreciate being hosannaed by the crowds. And I shrink from everything that has the hallmark of "officialness". I vastly prefer to chat with Tex readers I may happen to meet at the coffee-bar and listen to their criticisms and suggestions. This being said, however, of course I am favorably impressed by all the events devoted to Tex. Such phenomena are truly a feast of friends: I can't possibly not feel pleased.
TEX WAS CREATED IN 1948, AFTER YOU'D ALREADY INVENTED SO MANY OTHER CHARACTERS. WHY DID TEX WILLER ACHIEVE SUCH AMAZING SUCCESS WHILE "YORGA", "YUMA KID", I TRE BILL AND OTHER CREATURES OF YOURS HAVE ALL BUT DISAPPEARED, LEAVING A MUCH FAINTER TRACE IN THE HISTORY OF ITALIAN COMIC STRIPS? DID YOU PUT SPECIAL EFFORT AND COMMITMENT INTO WRITING TEX?
No, not at all. And I must confess that even now, I don't really know why Tex worked well, while Yuma Kid, for instance, faded away. I can assure you, I put exactly the same effort and commitment into writing that character. But often I catch myself thinking that comic strips characters' lives are just real human beings' lives. Some of them are born under a lucky star while others will have a troubled life. And those of us who are in our line of work have to reckon with the chance of mysterious, unforeseeable "astral conjunctions". In other words, a comic strips writer who may actually have invented lots of characters that had no luck at all can suddenly come into the miraculous condition of having given birth to the right character (the right publishing product) at the right moment. Nevertheless, I want to point out that, at the beginning, Tex didn't actually get off to such a fabulous start. The strip started fairly modestly and then it settled down in the intermediate segments of the market at that time, trailing a long way behind the circulation of Grande Blek, Capitan Miki and Piccolo Sceriffo, just to give you an idea. Afterwards, in the fifties, this character "grew under my hands", I felt he increasingly belonged to me and I gradually identified myself more and more with him. And sales slowly began to increase, too. But anyway, by that point I was no longer bothered about the question of success as a publishing venture. I'll say it again: I was too "involved" in the character to think about anything else.
AMONG THE OTHER ITALIAN COMIC STRIP CREATORS, WHO WERE YOUR RIVALS? I MEAN, THE COLLEAGUES YOU HELD (AND STILL HOLD) IN ESTEEM?
This is a difficult question. After I set aside my role as a publisher in order to devote myself to writing comic strips, I never really looked around much to see who else was out there. Nevertheless, my somewhat unconcerned attitude didn't prevent me from reading and admiring some of the stories written by an old friend of mine Federico Pedrocchi, when they came out, or from appreciating the narrative talent of Andrea Lavezzolo, above all in those long comic strip series which, more or less explicitly, harked back to the glorious feuilleton. Or from following the famous characters of EsseGesse, which achieved outstanding publishing success.
NOW, WE'RE GOING TO HAVE A BIT OF FUN WITH THE NEXT THREE QUESTIONS, ALTHOUGH WHAT WE WANT TO ASK YOU IS IMPORTANT, BECAUSE IT WILL GIVE US SOME IDEA ABOUT THE CULTURAL BACKGROUND OF A GREAT POPULAR WRITER. NOW, IF YOU WERE TO BE SHIPWRECKED ON A DESERT ISLAND AND YOU COULD TAKE TEN BOOKS ALONG WITH YOU, WHICH ONES WOULD YOU CHOOSE?
I'll play the game! Take your pen and write: " Heart of Darkness" by Joseph Conrad, "Burning Daylight" by Jack London, "The Three Musketeers" by Alexandre Dumas, "The Scarlet Pimpernel" by Baroness Orczy, "She" by Rider Haggard, "King Solomon's Mines" by Rider Haggard, " Texas Ranger" by Zane Grey, "Bosambo of the River" by Edgar Wallace, "Capitan Blood" by Rafael Sabatini, "I misteri della Giungla Nera" by Emilio Salgari.
YOU CAN ALSO HAVE TEN VIDEOS ON YOUR DESERT ISLAND. SO CHOOSE WHICH MOVIES YOU'LL SAVE.
I'll tell you those titles immediately: "Fort Apache" by John Ford, "Johnny Guitar" by Nicholas Ray, "Stagecoach" by Ford, "Gunfight At The Ok Corral" by John Sturges, "Shane" by George Stevens, "3:10 to Yuma" by Delmer Daves, "The Searchers" by Ford, "Winchester '73" by Anthony Mann, "High Noon" by Fred Zinnemann, "Vera Cruz" by Robert Aldrich. AND AGAIN, ON THIS FAMOUS ISLAND YOU CAN ALSO BRING ALONG TEN TEX STORIES.
I'll take along "Sangue Navajo", "La voce misteriosa", "Le Terre dell'Abisso", "La gola della morte", "La notte degli assassini", "Massacro", "Il Signore dell'Abisso", "Vendetta indiana", "Dramma al circo", "La cella della morte".
NOW WE'D LIKE TO ASK YOU: HOW DID YOU GET THE AMAZINGLY FORWARD-LOOKING IDEA OF AN ANTIRACIST HERO, A FRIEND OF THE OPPRESSED, LEADER OF THE INDIANS AND FATHER OF A MIXED BLOOD CHILD?
I don't think words like "racism" and "antiracism" could be used for my tales. Rather, I think the question you've raised has to be considered from two angles. If we analyse this strip, in my Tex there's a strong reaction against injustice, ill-treatment, abuse of power. And when the so-called "bullies" are whites moving further and further towards the west, then you do also find a reaction against genocide and against racist intolerance. However, I have always considered the struggle against discrimination within the wider context of rebellion against any form of oppression. On the other hand if you consider the atmosphere of the period in which Tex was born, then my choice has to be seen as a reaction against the prevailing conformism of that time. But why was I that way whereas other people weren't ? Well, even at that time I used to read a lot of books about the Native Americans and I'd learned to respect those indomitable populations.
WE'VE ALWAYS BEEN INTRIGUED BY YOUR INTERPRETATION OF KIT CARSON. ANY COMMENTS ABOUT THAT?
My Carson has nothing to do with the historical character. Tex's pard is a cheerful companion of adventures, a meek man who becomes brusque and implacable when the circumstances call for it. The true Kit Carson, on the other hand, was an unscrupulous and cynic individual, who was even guilty of fighting against the Navajos with extremely unfair means.
AS A COMIC STRIP CREATOR YOU CAME INTO THE LIMELIGHT IN THE 1930S TOGETHER WITH THOSE AMERICAN COMIC STRIPS THAT BECAME CULT OBJECTS FOR THE PRE-WAR GENERATION, BUT ARE STILL IDOLIZED BY MANY YOUNG PEOPLE TODAY. FOR INSTANCE FLASH GORDON, PHANTOM, CINO AND FRANCO, MANDRAKE: WHAT WOULD YOU SAY WAS YOUR RELATION TO THESE CELEBRATED COMIC STRIPS?
I used to read them. I liked them. But nothing more. My way of story-telling is completely different from the American approach. The technique of those great scriptwriters (so concise, so terse) was bound by the medium their tales were intended for: a strip of three panels in daily newspapers. Whereas I have always preferred a manner of story-telling which is suited for long episodes rich in dialogue. 
YOU WERE AN AVID READER OF CRIME STORIES OF THE FLOURISHING PERIOD: VAN DINE, CHRISTIE, WALLACE; BUT IN THE TEX STORIES MYSTERY DOESN'T SEEM TO BE AN IMPORTANT INGREDIENT. WHY NOT?
I have always preferred action to plot complexity. My characters are people who move in vast wild places and so they necessarily have to be much more dynamic than, say, Hercule Poirot or Philo Vancer. However, I'd like to correct you on one point. Rather than the authors you mentioned, I actually prefer the writers of action-packed detective novels of the forties and the fifties. Two classic names: Peter Cheyney and Mickey Spillane.
THROUGHOUT ALL THESE YEARS, WHAT KIND OF RELATIONSHIP HAVE YOU HAD WITH AURELIO GALLEPPINI AND, MORE GENERALLY, WITH THOSE WHO'VE CREATED THE ARTWORK FOR TEX?
Unfortunately, the physical distance separating Milan from the Tex illustrators has made it difficult for me to establish the same close relationship I once had with illustrators such as Antonio Canale, Rino Albertarelli, Raffaele Paparella, Pier Lorenzo De Vita, Carlo and Vittorio Cossio. I used to often meet up with these friends, as we lived in the same city, and we used to talk about comic strips in a coffee bar or out on the street or at someone's home, in a light-heartedly bohemian atmosphere. However, for many years I spent my summer holidays in a mountain resort, where I used to spend the days together with Aurelio Galleppini and his family.

The creator of Tex
The late lamented Giovanni Luigi Bonelli, a prolific scriptwriter, 
considered as the Patriarch of the Italian comic strip, will forever be remembered in connection with Tex Willer, a character created in 1948 for the publishing house L'Audace, the ancestor of the present-day Sergio Bonelli Editore. Giovanni Luigi Bonelli wrote the stories of all of the Tex adventures published until beyond the mid-1980s. Born on 22nd December 1908 in Milan, Giovanni Luigi Bonelli started by contributing a series of poems to the "Corriere dei Piccoli", followed by a few works that appeared in the "Giornale illustrato dei viaggi" published by Sonzogno. In the same period, he wrote three adventure novels: "Le Tigri dell'Atlantico", "Il Crociato Nero" and "I Fratelli del Silenzio". After these initial experiences, he entered into the comic strip world by supervising a series of journals and magazines on behalf of Lotario Vecchi, which were published by the Saev Press of Milan. His name appeared in "Primarosa", "L'Audace", "Rintintin" and "Jumbo" and between 1937 and 1939 he became the most important subjectwriter of "Il Vittorioso", a weekly publication. When "L'Audace" was taken over by Mondadori, Bonelli continued to work for this team until 1939, the year in which he became its publisher. After the war he resumed his activity by working for small presses until 1947. Then he undertook a joint project with Giovanni Di Leo, setting up a series of activities among which the expansion of the "Cow Boy" weekly and the translation of the French publications "Robin Hood" and "Fantax, produced by Pierre Mouchot's studio. In the meanwhile, in 1946, he wrote "La Perla Nera", a short tale illustrated by Franco Caprioli; followed in 1947 by "Ipnos" with artwork by Gino Cossio, Paolo Piffarerio, Guido Dapassano and Mario Uggeri. 1948 saw the advent of "Occhio Cupo" and Tex, both illustrated by Galleppini, and "Pattuglia dei senza paura" with artwork by Zamperoni and Donatelli. "Il giustiziere del West" was published in the same year and rendered graphically by Giorgio Scudellari. In 1949 Giovanni Bonelli wrote the short series "Plutos" for Leone Cimpellin; 1954 was the year of "Il Cavaliere Nero" illustrated by EsseGesse and "Yuma Kid", rendered by Mario Uggeri. One year later, "I tre Bill" was created, with three illustrators contributing, at different times, to the artwork, Giovanni Benvenuti, Gino D'Antonio, Roy D'Ami and Renzo Calegari. Also created in that same year was "El Kid", illustrated by Dino Battaglia, Gino D'Antonio and Renzo Calegari. "Davy Crockett" was created in 1956, with artwork by Renzo Calegari and Carlo Porciani. "Hondo", illustrated by Franco Bignotti and "Kociss" and illustrated by Emilio Uberti, dates from 1957. In 1962 Bonelli resumed and completed the long saga "Un ragazzo nel Far West", for which the subject was conceived by Nolitta. He continued to supervise the production of Tex until he passed away on 12 January 2001.

Aurelio Galleppini , also known as Galep, the graphic designer of this character and illustrator, was born in Casal di Pari (Grosseto) on 28th August 1917, of Sardinian parents. After spending most of his youth in Sardinia, he abandoned his studies in the second year of the "Istituto industriale" in order to take up drawing and painting, which he cultivated as a self-taught art. When he was 18 years old some of his drawings appeared in animated cartoons created on behalf of a German factory, which produced two-stroke projectors. Galleppini's first drawings published in a periodical date from 1936: they were illustrated fairy tales destined to "Mondo Fanciullo". From 1937 till 1939 he contributed to "Modellina" with his first illustrated tales - "In terra straniera", "La prova dei coccodrilli", "All'ombra del tricolore", "Le avventure di Pulcino" (the latter a large colour album with a comic slant). He also designed some cover illustrations for "Il Mattino Illustrato" and contributed the artwork for "Il segreto del motore" by Andrea Lavezzolo. During the same years he provided the artwork for two long comic-strip stories published by Mondadori, with scripts by Federico Pedrocchi: "Pino il mozzo" and "Le perle del mar d'Oman". In 1940, Galleppini moved to Florence where he started working with the publishing house Nerbini. Several comic strip stories came out in "L'Avventuroso", for some of which Galleppini also composed the scripts. However, the censorship and other absurd orders issued by the regime, which made a travesty of the content and form of comic-strip stories, prompted Galleppini to temporarily cease all activity in this field. During the immediate post-war period he devoted himself to painting (with noteworthy success), designing posters and teaching the art of drawing. In 1947 he resumed his activity as an illustrator with a series of albums for "L'Intrepido", including: "Il clan dei vendicatori", "Il corsaro gentiluomo", "Il giustiziere invisibile", "La perla azzurra". Moreover, he illustrated books such as "I tre moschettieri", "La maschera di ferro", "Le mille e una notte", "Il barone di Münchhausen" and "Pinocchio" (the latter as a comic-strip). At the end of 1947, Galleppini established contact with the director of the "L'Audace" press, suggesting a resumption of his activity at L'Audace. He thus began to illustrate the fortnightly magazine "Occhio Cupo" and the weekly issue "Tex", the scripts for which were written by Giovanni Luigi Bonelli. Tex marked a turning point in the artistic activity of Aurelio Galleppini, who thereafter devoted himself body and soul to this publication, except for brief and exceptional pauses such as the tale "L'Uomo del Texas", which was created in 1977 with a script by Guido Nolitta for the series "Un Uomo, un'Avventura". Galep created all the artwork for the Tex stories single-handedly for a good many years, until the enormous expansion of the publication called for the assistance of other illustrators. However, he designed all the cover illustrations of the series right up to issue number 400. A devotion (indeed, virtually a symbiosis) broken off only when Galep passed away in Chiavari (Genoa) on 10th March 1994.

 

THE STAFF OF TEX
Gianluigi Bonelli, inventor of the series and script-writer, he authored: Tex nn. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 142, 143, 144, 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 166, 167, 168, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 176, 177, 178, 179, 180, 181, 182, 183, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 191, 192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 200, 201, 202, 207, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 226, 227, 228, 229, 230, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 236, 239, 240, 241, 242, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 256, 257, 258, 259, 260, 261, 262, 263, 264, 265, 266, 267, 268, 269, 270, 271, 274, 275, 277, 278, 279, 282, 283, 284, 285, 292, 293, 295, 296, 300, 309, 311, 312, 319, 320, 321, 323, 340, 341, 364.

Aurelio Galleppini, cover illustrator of the series up to issue nr. 400 and artwork creator, he authored: Tex nn. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 103, 104, 105, 106, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 125, 126, 127, 128, 134, 137, 138, 139, 154, 155, 156, 162, 163, 164, 175, 176, 180, 181, 182, 183, 190, 191, 200, 207, 208, 209, 223, 224, 225, 226, 242, 243, 244, 245, 265, 266, 267, 268, 276, 277, 287, 288, 289, 300, 312, 313, 314, 338, 339, 340, 377, 378, 400, Speciale Tex 3.

Giancarlo Alessandrini, Speciale Tex 20.

Carlo Ambrosini, Speciale Tex 19.

Stefano Andreucci, artwork creator, he authored: Tex nn. Almanacco del West 2003.

Giancarlo Berardi, script-writer, he authored: Maxi Tex 1991.

Jordi Bernet, artwork creator, he authored: Speciale Tex 10.

Marco Bianchini, 576, 577, 578.

Stefano Biglia, artwork creator, he authored: Almanacco del West 1994.

Jesús Blasco, artwork creator, he authored: Tex nn. 307, 308, 309, 326, 327, 328, 351, 352, 353, 369, 370, 371, 397, 398, 399, 403, 404, 405.

Mauro Boselli, script-writer, he authored: Tex nn. 309, 310, 407, 408, 409, 416, 417, 418, 420, 421, 422, 435, 436, 437, 438, 439, 440, 445, 446, 452, 453, 454, 458, 459, 460, 463, 464, 465, 467, 468, 469, 470, 473, 474, 478, 479, 483, 484, 488, 489, 497, 498, 499, 506, 507, 523, 524, 525, 528, 529, 538, 539, 544, 545, 546, 547, 556, 557, 563, 564, 569, 570, 571, 572, 573, 574, 576, 577, 578, 579, 580, 583, 584, 593, 594, 595, Almanacco del West 1997, Almanacco del West 1998, Almanacco del West 2000, Almanacco del West 2003, Almanacco del West 2007, Maxi Tex 2001, Speciale Tex 12, Speciale Tex 23.

Bruno Brindisi, artwork creator, he authored: 519, 520, Speciale Tex 16.

Giovanni Bruzzo, artist 591, 592.

Guido Buzzelli, artwork creator, he authored: Speciale Tex 1.

Renzo Calegari, artwork creator, he authored: Almanacco del West 1994.

Decio Canzio, script-writer, he authored: Tex nn. 401, 402, 403, 405, 406.

Aldo Capitanio, artwork creator, he authored: Tex nn. 488, 489, Almanacco del West 1997, Speciale Tex 8.

Raul e Gianluca Cestaro, artwork creators, they authored: Tex nn. 518, 534, 535, 581, 582.

Fabio Civitelli, artwork creator, he authored: Tex nn. 293, 294, 295, 304, 305, 306, 307, 319, 320, 321, 323, 346, 347, 348, 349, 367, 368, 369, 393, 394, 395, 414, 415, 416, 443, 444, 445, 475, 476, 477, 493, 511, 512, 536, 537, 554, 555, 575, 585, 586, Almanacco del West 2005.

Luigi Copello, artwork creator, he authored: Almanacco del West 1994.

Ugolino Cossu, Maxi Tex 2008.

Roberto De Angelis, artwork creator, he authored: Tex nn. Speciale Tex 18.

Víctor De La Fuente, artwork creator, he authored: Tex nn. 441, 442, 456, 457, 471, 472, Almanacco del West 1995, Speciale Tex 5.

Pasquale Del Vecchio, artwork creator, he authored: Tex nn. 561, 562, 589, 590.

Raffaele Della Monica, artwork creator, he authored: Tex nn. 350, 351, 375, 376, Maxi Tex 2006.

Roberto Diso, Almanacco del West 2004, Maxi Tex 2003, Maxi Tex 2007.

Maurizio Dotti, artwork creator, he authored: Almanacco del West 1998.

Tito Faraci, script-writer, he authored: 558, 559, 581, 582, 591, 592.

Lucio Filippucci, Speciale Tex 22.
 
Alfonso Font, artwork creator, he authored: 523, 524, 525, 538, 539, 556, 557, 573, 574, 593, 594, 595, Almanacco del West 2000, Maxi Tex 2001, Speciale Tex 12.

Pasquale Frisenda, Speciale Tex 23.

Fernando Fusco, artwork creator, he authored: Tex nn. 168, 169, 183, 185, 203, 207, 217, 218, 219, 229, 230, 231, 232, 241, 242, 248, 249, 254, 255, 256, 274, 275, 279, 280, 281, 289, 290, 291, 292, 302, 303, 304, 314, 315, 316, 330, 331, 332, 333, 343, 344, 345, 346, 365, 366, 367, 378, 379, 380, 381, 399, 401, 402, 403, 412, 413, 414, 428, 429, 447, 448, 461, 462, 485, 486, 487, 508, 509, 510, 530, 531, 532, 533, 560, Almanacco del West 2010.

Francesco Gamba, artwork creator, he authored: Tex nn. 20, 25, 26, 27, 30, 31, 33, 34, 35, 40, 41, 43, 44, 48, 49, 64, 65, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 247.

Alarico Gattia, artwork creator, he authored: Almanacco del West 1998.

Alberto Giolitti, artwork creator, he authored: Tex nn. 188, 189, 357, 358, 373, 374, 431, 432, 433, Speciale Tex 2.

Lino Jeva, artwork creator, he authored: Tex nn. 18.

Joe Kubert, artwork creator, he authored: Speciale Tex 15.

Guglielmo Letteri, artwork creator, he authored: Tex nn. 68, 69, 72, 73, 76, 77, 80, 81, 83, 86, 87, 88, 89, 95, 96, 101, 102, 103, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 117, 118, 119, 120, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 139, 140, 141, 151, 152, 153, 154, 160, 161, 162, 171, 172, 173, 174, 185, 186, 192, 193, 196, 197, 198, 199, 211, 212, 213, 220, 228, 229, 232, 233, 239, 240, 253, 254, 256, 257, 269, 270, 277, 278, 279, 285, 286, 287, 295, 296, 301, 302, 309, 310, 316, 317, 324, 325, 326, 336, 337, 338, 340, 341, 364, 387, 388, 389, 390, 391, 392, 405, 406, 410, 411, 420, 421, 422, 435, 436, 437, 452, 453, 454, 473, 474, 483, 484, 506, 507, 528, 529, Maxi Tex 1991, Maxi Tex 2006.

Gianfranco Manfredi, artwork creator, he authored: Tex nn. 585, 586, Maxi Tex 2005.

Carlo Raffaele Marcello, artwork creator, he authored: Tex nn. 371, 372, 373, 407, 408, 409, 416, 417, 418, 425, 426, 427, 428, 438, 439, 440, 445, 446, 463, 464, 465, 469, 470, 497, 498, 499.

Corrado Mastantuono, 583, 584, Speciale Tex 21.

Michele Medda, script-writer, he authored: Tex nn. 403, 404, 405, 410, 411.

Mario Milano, 552, 553.

Ivo Milazzo, artwork creator, he authored: Speciale Tex 13.

Vincenzo Monti, artwork creator, he authored: Tex nn. 262, 263, 264, 270, 271, 282, 283, 292, 293, 296, 297, 321, 322, 341, 342, 343, 362, 363, 395, 396, 397, 419, 420, 430, 431, 480, 481, 482, 519.

Virgilio Muzzi, artwork creator, he authored: Tex nn. 44, 45, 49, 50, 51, 53, 56, 58, 59, 60, 63, 67, 73, 74, 75, 78, 81, 82, 83, 87, 88, 92, 93, 96, 97, 98, 116, 117, 130, 131, 149, 150, 151, 181, 182, 183.

Erio Nicolò, artwork creator, he authored: Tex nn. 63, 64, 106, 107, 108, 120, 121, 128, 129, 141, 142, 143, 144, 145, 156, 157, 158, 159, 160, 164, 165, 166, 169, 170, 171, 177, 178, 179, 186, 187, 188, 193, 194, 195, 196, 202, 203, 209, 210, 214, 215, 220, 221, 222, 223, 226, 227, 236, 237, 238, 239, 245, 246, 247, 257, 258, 259, 261, 262, 273, 274, 282, 283.

Claudio Nizzi, script-writer, he authored: Tex nn. 273, 274, 279, 280, 281, 285, 286, 287, 293, 294, 295, 296, 297, 298, 299, 301, 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 307, 308, 309, 312, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317, 318, 319, 321, 322, 324, 325, 326, 327, 328, 329, 330, 331, 332, 333, 334, 335, 336, 337, 338, 339, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 350, 351, 352, 353, 354, 355, 356, 357, 358, 359, 360, 361, 362, 363, 365, 366, 367, 368, 369, 370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 375, 376, 377, 378, 379, 380, 381, 382, 383, 384, 385, 386, 387, 393, 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, 399, 400, 405, 406, 412, 413, 414, 415, 416, 419, 420, 423, 424, 425, 426, 427, 428, 429, 430, 431, 441, 442, 443, 444, 445, 447, 448, 449, 450, 451, 452, 455, 456, 457, 461, 462, 471, 472, 475, 476, 477, 480, 481, 482, 485, 486, 487, 490, 491, 492, 493, 494, 495, 496, 500, 501, 502, 503, 504, 505, 508, 509, 510, 511, 512, 513, 514, 515, 516, 517, 518, 519, 520, 521, 522, 526, 527, 530, 531, 532, 533, 534, 535, 536, 537, 540, 541, 542, 543, 548, 549, 550, 551, 552, 553, 554, 555, 560, 561, 562, 565, 566, 567, 568, 575, 587, 588, 589, 590, 596, 597, Almanacco del West 1994, Almanacco del West 1995, Almanacco del West 1996, Almanacco del West 1999, Almanacco del West 2001, Almanacco del West 2002, Almanacco del West 2005, Almanacco del West 2006, Almanacco del West 2009, Almanacco del West 2010, Maxi Tex 2002, Maxi Tex 2003, Maxi Tex 2006, Maxi Tex 2007, Maxi Tex 2008, Speciale Tex 1, Speciale Tex 2, Speciale Tex 3, Speciale Tex 4, Speciale Tex 5, Speciale Tex 6, Speciale Tex 7, Speciale Tex 8, Speciale Tex 9, Speciale Tex 10, Speciale Tex 11, Speciale Tex 13, Speciale Tex 14, Speciale Tex 15, Speciale Tex 16, Speciale Tex 17, Speciale Tex 18, Speciale Tex 19, Speciale Tex 20, Speciale Tex 21.

Guido Nolitta, (Sergio Bonelli), script-writer, he authored: Tex nn. 183, 184, 185, 190, 191, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 220, 221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 236, 237, 238, 239, 242, 243, 244, 245, 250, 251, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 261, 262, 271, 272, 273, 276, 277, 287, 288, 289, 290, 291, 292, 387, 388, 389, 390, 391, 392, 431, 432, 433, 434, 435, 466, 467.

José Ortiz, artwork creator, he authored: Tex nn. 449, 450, 458, 459, 460, 478, 479, 494, 495, 496, 515, 516, 517, 540, 541, 550, 551, 558, 559, 596, 597, Maxi Tex 1997, Maxi Tex 1999, Maxi Tex 2004, Maxi Tex n° 13, Speciale Tex 6.

Goran Parlov, artwork creator, he authored: Speciale Tex 11.

Alessandro Piccinelli, artwork creator, he authored: 579, 580.

Pietro Raschitelli, artwork creator, he authored: Tex nn. 85, 86.

Roberto Raviola (Magnus), artwork creator, he authored: Speciale Tex 9.

Miguel Angel Repetto, artwork creator, he authored: 504, 505, 526, 527, 544, 565, 566, Almanacco del West 1999, Almanacco del West 2002, Maxi Tex 2000, Maxi Tex 2002, Maxi Tex 2005.

Rossano Rossi, 567, 568, Almanacco del West 2005.

Pasquale Ruju, artwork creator, he authored: Tex nn. Almanacco del West 2004, Almanacco del West 2008.

Marco Santucci, 576, 577, 578.

Antonio Segura, artwork creator, he authored: Maxi Tex 1997, Maxi Tex 1999, Maxi Tex 2000, Maxi Tex 2004, Maxi Tex n° 13.

Ernesto Garcia Seijas, 571, 572, Almanacco del West 2007.

Manfred Sommer, artwork creator, he authored: Tex nn. 546, 547, Almanacco del West 2009, Speciale Tex 17.

Dante Spada, artwork creator, he authored: Tex nn. 563, 564.

Giovanni Ticci, artwork creator, he authored: Tex nn. 91, 108, 109, 121, 122, 123, 124, 146, 147, 148, 149, 166, 167, 168, 179, 180, 188, 189, 199, 201, 202, 215, 216, 217, 233, 234, 235, 236, 250, 251, 252, 259, 260, 261, 264, 265, 271, 272, 273, 283, 284, 285, 297, 298, 299, 317, 318, 319, 333, 334, 335, 358, 359, 360, 361, 362, 384, 385, 386, 387, 432, 433, 434, 435, 455, 466, 467, 468, 469, 490, 491, 492, 500, 521, 522, 542, 543, 569, 570, 571, Speciale Tex 7.

Mario Uggeri, artwork creator, he authored: Tex nn. 9, 21, 22.

Andrea Venturi, artwork creator, he authored: Tex nn. 451, 452, 513, 514, 548, 549, 587, 588, Almanacco del West 1996, Almanacco del West 2001.

Claudio Villa, cover illustrator of the series from issue nr. 401 and artwork creator, he authored: Tex nn. 311, 312, 328, 329, 330, 354, 355, 356, 357, 381, 382, 383, 384, 423, 424, 425, 501, 502, 503, 504.

Colin Wilson, artwork creator, he authored: Speciale Tex 14.

Sergio Zaniboni, artwork creator, he authored: Speciale Tex 4.

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